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Brooms in the Appalachian Artifacts Collection

Selected brooms and broom-making-related artifacts as documented by Student Curators in 2015

Fodder Chopper / Broom Corn Cutter 1992.3.1

Provenance Notes: This item was commonly called a fodder chopper, feed chopper, corn chopper, or hand chopper, or just a chopper. It was a common farm implement and had many uses.  The donor reported that this chopper was used by his uncle, Benjamin Anglin, of Rockcastle County, Kentucky, to cut broom corn for broommaking during the 1920s and 30s. 

Descriptive Notes: This chopper stands 29 inches tall and is 33 inches long.  It has no markings except the numbers "750", "751", "752", and "753" on the four iron castings.  It appears tha that front legs, left side, and bottom are original along with all four castings and the blade.  The right side and rear leg appear to be replacements.  The handle support on the front right leg appears to have been added. 

Source: Donation by James A. Thomas

 

Broomcorn Basket 1969.1.1005

Detail Views (Click to vew larger image)


Descriptive Notes: Small basket made from strips of braided broom corn.  Since piece body, coil construction, beginning from center of bottom to the rim.  Braided strips are sewn together using cotton string or thread.  Handle is a separate strip of brade attached also by sewing with cotton string or thread.  Basket is 5 inches in diameter, 5-1/4 inches tall.  Body fo the basket is 2 -/2 inches deep.  Braided strips are approximately one-inch in diameter.  There are no markings on the basket. 

Provenance Notes: Made of broom corn scraps by Mrs. Ogle, wife of Richard Ogle, aka "Broom-Tie" Ogle, of Gatlinburg area.  Mrs. Ogle developed these basket patterns to make use of the scraps from her husbands broom-making business.  This basket is also a part of the Edna Lynn Simms / East Tennessee Collection

Source: Donation, Edna Lynn Simms Estate

 

Broomcorn Basket 1969.1.1006

Detail Views (Click to vew larger image)

Descriptive Notes: Small basket made from strips of braided broom corn.  Since piece body, coil construction, beginning from center of bottom to the rim.  Braided strips are sewn together using cotton string or thread.  Handle is a separate strip of brade attached also by sewing with cotton string or thread.  Basket is oval 9-1/4 inches by 4-1/2 inches, 6-1/4 inches tall.  Body fo the basket is 4 inches deep.  Braided strips are approximately one-inch in diameter.  There are no markings on the basket. 

Provenance Notes: Made of broom corn scraps by Mrs. Ogle, wife of Richard Ogle, aka "Broom-Tie" Ogle, of Gatlinburg area.  Mrs. Ogle developed these basket patterns to make use of the scraps from her husbands broom-making business.  This basket is also a part of the Edna Lynn Simms / East Tennessee Collection

Source: Donation, Edna Lynn Simms Estate